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Friday, 25 December 2015

Merry Christmas Everybody 2015

I'd would like to wish you all a very Merry Christmas

Wednesday, 15 April 2015

Hans-Georg Zimmer

Career:

Branch: Kriegsmarine
Born:
Died:

Ranks:
Fregattenkapitän
Korvettenkapitän
Kapitänleutnant
Oberleutnant zur See
Leutnant zur See
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See

Decorations:

Commands:
Wolf
Takes command on October 1933
Ends command on September 1935

Paul Jakobi
Takes command on November 1938
Ends command on February 1941

Personal Information:

Hans-Georg Zimmer and was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Fregattenkapitän and went on to command the following Wolf and Paul Jakobi.

Hans-Georg Zimmer first command was the torpedo boat Wolf on October 1933 until September 1935, which time Hans-Georg Zimmer was transferred to the destroyer Paul Jakobi on November 1938 until February 1941.

Gallery:

Other: Personnel
Articles:

Sources:

For a complete list of sources

Ferdinand Adolf Heinrich August Graf von Zeppelin

Ferdinand Adolf Heinrich August Graf von Zeppelin

Career:

Branch: Civilian
Born: 8 July 1838, Grand Duchy of Baden. near Konstanz, Germany.
Died: 8 March 1917, Berlin, Germany.

Appointment's:

Decorations:

Personal Information:

Ferdinand Adolf Heinrich August Graf von Zeppelin was born at Constance, 8 July 1838. Ferdinand von Zeppelin joined the army at the age of 20 and in 1863 fought in the American Civil War on the union side. Returning to Germany he saw active service in the wars of 1866 and 1870-1871.

Ferdinand von Zeppelin retired from the army in 1891 Ferdinand von Zeppelin devoted the re-mainder of his life to aeronautics. In 1899 he formed a company and built his first floating airship dock.

For some years Ferdinand von Zeppelin continued his airship construction until in 1966 Ferdinand von Zeppelin made a successful flight of 60 miles in 2 hours. The German government then came to his help and in 1908 his fourth airship passed the government's tests but was wrecked.

Ferdinand von Zeppelin died March 8th, 1917.

Gallery:

Other: Personnel
Articles:

Sources:

For a complete list of sources

Karl Adolf Zenker

Karl Adolf Zenker

Career:

Branch: Reichsmarine / Kriegsmarine
Born: 19 July 1907 in Berlin-Schöneberg, Germany.
Died: 27 March 1998 in Bonn, Germany.

Ranks:
Vizeadmiral September 1967
Konteradmiral 15 October 1960
Kommodore
Kapitän zur See 21 December 1955
Fregattenkapitän 1945
Korvettenkapitän 19 January 1944
Kapitänleutnant 1 April 1936
Oberleutnant zur See
Leutnant zur See
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See

Decorations:

Commands:
M146
Takes command on 23 September 1936
Ends command on November 1938

Hans Lody
Takes command on 11 August 1942
Ends command on 11 March 1943

Z28
Takes command on March 1943
Ends command on 19 January 1944

Personal Information:

Karl Adolf Zenker was born on 19 July 1907 in Berlin-Schöneberg, Germany and was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Vizeadmiral and went on to command the following M146, Hans Lody and Z28.

Karl Adolf Zenker joined Reichsmarine as a Seekadett on 1 April 1926 and went to the naval school in Mürwik and continued his training on board training ship Niobe. From 23 March 1928. He was aboard the light cruiser Emden.

Karl Adolf Zenker went on to command the minesweeper M146 on 23 September 1936 until November 1938. For years later, he went on to command, the destroyer Hans Lody on 11 August 1942 until 11 March 1943, Karl Adolf Zenker was transferred to the destroyer Z28 on March 1943 until 19 January 1944.

Karl Adolf Zenker went on to serve with the Bundesmarine and managed to attained the rank of Vizeadmiral.

Gallery:

Other: Personnel
Articles:

Sources:

For a complete list of sources

Albert Zaage

Career:

Branch: Kriegsmarine
Born:
Died:

Ranks:
Korvettenkapitän
Kapitänleutnant
Oberleutnant zur See
Leutnant zur See
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See

Decorations:


Commands:
17. Räumbootsflottille
Takes command on July 1944
Ends command on March 1945

Personal Information:

Albert Zaage was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Korvettenkapitän and went on to command the following 17. Räumbootsflottille.

Gallery:

Other: Personnel
Articles:

Sources:

For a complete list of sources

Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter Z

Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter Z

There are 4 Wehrmacht Personnel details for the letter Z. 

Key for abbreviations. 
(C) = Civilian.
(G) = Government, Royalty.
(H) = Kaiserliche Heer, Reichsheer, Wehrmacht Heer.
(K) = Kaiserliche Marine, Reichsmarine, Kriegsmarine.
(L) = Luftstreitkraefte, Luftwaffe.
(SA) = Sturmabteilung.
(SS) = Waffen SS.
  1. Albert Zaage (K)
  2. Karl Adolf Zenker (K)
  3. Ferdinand Adolf Heinrich August Graf von Zeppelin (C)
  4. Hans-Georg Zimmer (K)
Sources

For a complete list of sources

Hans-Heinrich Wurmbach

Hans-Heinrich Wurmbach

Career:

Branch: Kaiserliche Marine / Reichsmarine / Kriegsmarine
Born: 12 May 1891 in Siegen, Germany.
Died: 16 December 1965 in Schleswig, Germany.

Ranks:
Admiral 1 October 1944
Vizeadmiral 1 September 1942
Konteradmiral 1 September 1940
Kommodore
Kapitän zur See 1 October 1936
Fregattenkapitän 1 October 1934
Korvettenkapitän 1 April 1929
Kapitänleutnant 1 March 1921
Oberleutnant zur See 26 April 1917
Leutnant zur See 3 August 1914
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See 15 April 1912

Decorations:

Commands:
U-38
Takes command on 16 November 1917
Ends command on 18 January 1918

UC-101
Takes command on 8 October 1918
Ends command on 11 November 1918

M90
Takes command on 2 June 1921
Ends command on 9 June 1921

M90
Takes command on 24 August 1921
Ends command on 1 September 1921

Admiral Scheer
Takes command on 31 October 1938
Ends command on 31 October 1939

Personal Information:

Hans-Heinrich Wurmbach was born on 12 May 1891 in Siegen, Germany and was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Admiral and went on to command the following U-38, UC-101 , M90 and Admiral Scheer.

Hans-Heinrich Wurmbach joined Kaiserliche Marine as a Seekadett on 1 April 1911 and continued his training on board heavy cruiser Hansa.

Hans-Heinrich Wurmbach took command of U-boat U-38 on 16 November 1917 and remained in command until 18 January 1918 he was then transferred to the U-boat UC-101 on 8 October 1918 until the 11th of November 1918, several years passed. His next command was the minesweeper M90 on 2 June 1921 until 9 June 1921 however he was again in charge of the minesweeper M90 from 24 August 1921 until 1 September 1941, Hans-Heinrich Wurmbach was given command of the pocket battleship Admiral Scheer on 31 October 1938 until 31 October 1939.

Gallery:

Other: Personnel
Articles:

Sources:

For a complete list of sources

Ralf Raimar Wolfram

Career:

Branch: Kriegsmarine
Born:
Died:

Ranks:
Kapitänleutnant
Oberleutnant zur See
Leutnant zur See
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See

Decorations:

Commands:
T6
Takes command on April 1940
Ends command on November 1940

Personal Information:

Ralf Raimar Wolfram was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Kapitänleutnant and went on to command the following T6.

Ralf Raimar Wolfram took command of the torpedo boat T6 on April 1940 and remained in command until November 1940.

Gallery:

Other: Personnel
Articles:

Sources:

For a complete list of sources

Max-Eckart Wolff

Career:

Branch: Reichsmarine / Kriegsmarine
Born: 19 December 1902 in Wernigerode, Germany.
Died: 9 November 1988 in Bremen, Germany.

Ranks:
Kapitän zur See
Fregattenkapitän
Korvettenkapitän
Kapitänleutnant
Oberleutnant zur See
Leutnant zur See
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See

Decorations:
Iron Cross 1939
2nd Class 6 November 1939
1st Class 12 May 1940
Wound Badge in Black 13 May 1940
Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross on 4 August 1940
Destroyer War Badge 9 October 1940
Narvik Shield 10 November 1940
Great Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany March 1963

Commands:
Tiger
Takes command on September 1933
Ends command on September 1935

Georg Thiele
Takes command on October 1938
Ends command on April 1940

Personal Information:

Max-Eckart Wolff was born on 19 December 1902 in Wernigerode, Germany and was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Kapitän zur See and went on to command the following Tiger and Georg Thiele (Z2).

Max-Eckart Wolff joined Reichsmarine as a Seekadett.

Max-Eckart Wolff took command of the torpedo boat Tiger on September 1933 and remained in command until September 1935, Max-Eckart Wolff was then transferred to the destroyer Georg Thiele (Z2) on October 1938 until April 1940.

Gallery:

Other: Personnel
Articles:

Sources:

For a complete list of sources

Heinrich Woldag

Career:

Branch: Kriegsmarine
Born: 1892
Died: 16 April 1940.

Ranks:
Kapitän zur See
Fregattenkapitän
Korvettenkapitän
Kapitänleutnant
Oberleutnant zur See
Leutnant zur See
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See

Decorations:

Commands:
Blücher
Takes command on 20 September 1939
Ends command on 9 April 1940

Personal Information:

Heinrich Woldag was born on 1892 and was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Kapitän zur See and went on to command the following Blücher.

Heinrich Woldag was given the command of the heavy cruiser Blücher on 20 September 1939 and remained in command until 9 April 1940.

The Blücher was appointed to Group five during the invasion of Norway in April 1940, the Blücher served as Konteradmiral Oskar Kummetz's flagship. The ship led the flotilla of combat ships into the Oslofjord on the night of 8 April, to capture Oslo, the capital of Norway. 2 antiquated 28 cm coastal guns in the Oscarsborg fort opened fire at the Blücher at very close range, making 2 hits. 2 torpedoes fired by land based torpedo batteries hit the Blücher, causing grave damage. A huge fire broke out onboard the Blücher, which could not be stopped. After a magazine blowup, the ship slowly capsized and sank, with huge loss of life. The Blücher shipwreck still remains on the bottom of the Oslofjord.

Gallery:

Other: Personnel
Articles:

Sources:

For a complete list of sources

Heinrich Wittig

Career:

Branch: Reichsmarine / Kriegsmarine
Born: 25 March 1905 in Goslar, Lower Saxony, Germany.
Died:

Ranks:
Fregattenkapitän 1 October 1943
Korvettenkapitän 1 January 1940
Kapitänleutnant 1935
Oberleutnant zur See November 1931
Leutnant zur See 1 October 1929
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See 1927

Decorations:

Commands:
Albatros
Takes command on November 1937
Ends command on February 1938

Luchs
Takes command on February 1938
Ends command on March 1938

Hermann Schoemann
Takes command on October 1940
Ends command on May 1942

Z23
Takes command on May 1942
Ends command on March 1944

Personal Information:

Heinrich Wittig was born on 25 March 1905 in Goslar, Lower Saxony, Germany and was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Fregattenkapitän and went on to command the following Albatros, Luchs, Hermann Schoemann (Z7), and Z23.

Heinrich Wittig joined Reichsmarine as a Seekadett on 1 August 1925 and went to the naval school in Mürwik and continued his training on board training ship Niobe.

Heinrich Wittig was given the command of the torpedo boat Albatros on November 1937 and remained in command until February 1938, he was then transferred to the torpedo boat Luchs on February 1938 until March 1938, Heinrich Wittig was then given command of the destroyer Hermann Schoemann (Z7) on October 1940, until May 1942 when he took over command of the destroyer Z23 on May 1942 until March 1944.

Gallery:

Other: Personnel
Articles:

Sources:

For a complete list of sources

Waldemar Winther

Waldemar Winther

Career:

Branch: Kaiserliche Marine / Reichsmarine / Kriegsmarine
Born: 12 June 1897 in Gießen, Hessen, Germany.
Died: 6 April 1983 in Bremen, Germany.

Ranks:
Konteradmiral 1 April 1943
Kommodore
Kapitän zur See 1 November 1939
Fregattenkapitän 1 October 1937
Korvettenkapitän 1 October 1934
Kapitänleutnant 1 January 1928
Oberleutnant zur See 10 January 1921
Leutnant zur See 17 June 1917
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See 24 December 1915

Decorations:

Commands:
M134
Takes command on 1 March 1927
Ends command on 25 September 1928

Leipzig
Takes command on 25 September 1942
Ends command on 18 February 1943

Personal Information:

Waldemar Winther was born on 12 June 1897 in Gießen, Hessen, Germany and was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Konteradmiral and went on to command the following Leipzig

Waldemar Winther joined Kaiserliche Marine as a Seekadett on 7 April 1915 and continued his training on board heavy cruiser Freya.

Waldemar Winther took command of the fleet tender M134 on 1 March 1927 and remained in command until 25 September 1928. In 1942 Waldemar Winther was given command of the light cruiser Leipzig on 25 September 1942 until 18 February 1943.

Gallery:

Other: Personnel
Articles:

Sources:

For a complete list of sources

Hans Wilcke

Career:

Branch: Kriegsmarine
Born:
Died:

Ranks:
Kapitänleutnant
Oberleutnant zur See
Leutnant zur See
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See

Decorations:

Commands:
Kondor
Takes command on April 1939
Ends command on October 1940

Personal Information:

Hans Wilcke was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Kapitänleutnant and went on to command the following Kondor.

Hans Wilcke was given the command of the torpedo boat Kondor on April 1939 and remained in command until October 1940.

Gallery:

Other: Personnel
Articles:

Sources:

For a complete list of sources

Ernst-Ludwig Wickmann

Career:

Branch: Kriegsmarine
Born:
Died:

Ranks:
Fregattenkapitän
Korvettenkapitän
Kapitänleutnant
Oberleutnant zur See
Leutnant zur See
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See

Decorations:

Commands:
Emden
Takes command on April 1945
Ends command on 3 May 1945

Personal Information:

Ernst-Ludwig Wickmann was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Fregattenkapitän and went on to command the following Emden.

Ernst-Ludwig Wickmann was given the command of the light cruiser Emden on April 1945 and remained in command until 3 May 1945.

Gallery:

Other: Personnel
Articles:

Sources:

For a complete list of sources

Kurt Weyher

Kurt Weyher

Career:

Branch: Kaiserliche Marine / Reichsmarine / Kriegsmarine
Born: 30 August 1901 in Grudziadz, Germany.
Died: 17 December 1991 in Wilhelmshaven, Germany.

Ranks:
Konteradmiral
Kommodore
Kapitän zur See
Fregattenkapitän
Korvettenkapitän
Kapitänleutnant
Oberleutnant zur See
Leutnant zur See
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See

Decorations:
Schlesischer Adler
2nd Class
1st Class
Bewährungsabzeichen der III. Marine-Brigade
Cross of Honor
Olympic Games Decoration 2nd Class
Wehrmacht Long Service Award 4th to 2nd Class
Medaille zur Erinnerung an den 1 October 1938
Spanish Cross
Iron Cross 1939
2nd Class 9 July 1940
1st Class 30 August 1940
Kriegsabzeichen für Hilfskreuzer 23 August 1941
Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross 21 August 1941
St. Alexander-Orden Kommandeurkreuz mit Schwertern
German Cross in Gold 18 May 1944
Order of Michael the Brave 3rd Class
Order of the Star of Romania Commodore with Swords
Cross of Merit on ribbon 29 April 1977

Commands:
G11
Takes command on September 1930
Ends command on September 1932

Horst Wessel
Takes command on January 1939
Ends command on September 1939

Orion
Takes command on 9 December 1939
Ends command on 24 August 1941

Personal Information:

Kurt Weyher was born on 30 August 1901 in Grudziadz, Germany and was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Konteradmiral and went on to command the following G11, Horst Wessel and Orion.

Kurt Weyher joined Kaiserliche Marine as a Seekadett on 2 April 1918 and went to the naval school in Mürwik and continued his training on board heavy cruiser Freya during this time, he was promoted to the rank of Fähnrich zur See.

Kurt Weyher was given the command of the torpedo boat G11 on September 1930 and remained in command until September 1932 several years later, was transferred to the training ship Horst Wessel on January 1939, until September 1939, Kurt Weyher was then given the command of the auxiliary cruiser Orion on 9 December 1939 until 24 August 1941.

Gallery:

Other: Personnel
Articles:

Sources:

For a complete list of sources

Paul Wever


Career:

Branch: Kaiserliche Marine / Reichsmarine / Kriegsmarine
Born: 28 January 1893 in Langenberg, Germany.
Died: 11 August 1944 in Aix-en-Provence, France.

Ranks:
Vizeadmiral 1 October 1943
Konteradmiral 1 September 1941
Kommodore
Kapitän zur See 1 April 1937
Fregattenkapitän 1 January 1936
Korvettenkapitän 1 October 1930
Kapitänleutnant 1 September 1922
Oberleutnant zur See 25 December 1917
Leutnant zur See 22 March 1915
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See 12 April 1913

Decorations:

Commands:
Emden
Takes command on 15 June 1938
Ends command on 5 May 1939

Personal Information:

Paul Wever was born on 28 January 1893 in Langenberg, Germany and was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Vizeadmiral and went on to command the following Emden.

Paul Wever joined Kaiserliche Marine as a Seekadett on 1 April 1912 and went to the naval school in Mürwik and continued his training on board heavy cruiser Hansa during this time, he was promoted to the rank of Fähnrich zur See.

Paul Wever was given the command of the light cruiser Emden on 15 June 1938 and remained in command until 5 May 1939.

Gallery:

Other: Personnel
Articles:

Sources:

For a complete list of sources

Walter Wenzel

Career:

Branch: Kriegsmarine
Born:
Died:

Ranks:
Kapitänleutnant
Oberleutnant zur See
Leutnant zur See
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See

Decorations:

Commands:
T8
Takes command on June 1942
Ends command on April 1944

Personal Information:

Walter Wenzel was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Kapitänleutnant and went on to command the following T8.

Walter Wenzel was given the command of the torpedo boat T8 on June 1942 and remained in command until April 1944.

Gallery:

Other: Personnel
Articles:

Sources:

For a complete list of sources

Arthur Wenniger

Career:

Branch: Kriegsmarine
Born:
Died:

Ranks:
Kapitän zur See
Fregattenkapitän
Korvettenkapitän
Kapitänleutnant
Oberleutnant zur See
Leutnant zur See
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See

Decorations:

Commands:
Iltis
Takes command on October 1935
Ends command on July 1937

Z43
Takes command on March 1944
Ends command on March 1945

Personal Information:

Arthur Wenniger was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Kapitän zur See and went on to command the following Iltis and Z43.

Arthur Wenniger was given the command of the torpedo boat Iltis on October 1935 and remained in command until July 1937, several years later, he was transferred to the destroyer Z43 on March 1944 until March 1945.

Gallery:

Other: Personnel
Articles:

Sources:

For a complete list of sources

Paul Wenneker

Paul Wenneker

Career:

Branch: Kriegsmarine
Born: 27 February 1890 in Kiel, Germany.
Died: 17 Octotober 1979 Hamburg, Germany.

Ranks:
Admiral 1 August 1944
Vizeadmiral 1 September 1941
Konteradmiral 1 October 1939
Kommodore
Kapitän zur See 1 April 1935
Fregattenkapitän 1 October 1933
Korvettenkapitän 1 October 1928
Kapitänleutnant 15 February 1920
Oberleutnant zur See 17 May 1919
Leutnant zur See 19 September 1912
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See 12 April 1910

Decorations:

Commands:
T109
Takes command on 1 May 1919
Ends command on 26 August 1919

M2
Takes command on 27 August 1919
Ends command on 22 March 1920

M30
Takes command on 12 August 1920
Ends command on 9 November 1921

M132
Takes command on 10 October 1921
Ends command on 7 March 1922

Lützow
Takes command on 2 September 1937
Ends command on 16 November 1939
We spent five days in the Deutschland
I commanded the captured City of Flint

Personal Information:

Paul Wenneker was born on 27 February 1890 in Kiel, Germany and was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Admiral and went on to command the following T109, M2, M30, M132 and Lützow.

Paul Wenneker joined Kaiserliche Marine as a Seekadett on 1 April 1909 and continued his training on board heavy cruiser Victoria Louise.

Paul Wenneker was given the command of the torpedo boat T109 on 1 May 1919 and remained in command until 26 August 1919. He then transferred to the minesweeper M2 on 27 August 1919 until 22 March 1920 he then transferred to the minesweeper M30 on 12 August 1920 until 9 November 1921. He then transferred to the minesweeper M132 on 10 October 1921 until 7 March 1922. Paul Wenneker was then given command of a pocket battleship Lützow on 2 September 1937 until 16 November 1939.

Gallery:

Other: Personnel
Articles:

Sources:

For a complete list of sources

Fritz Wendel

Fritz Wendel

Career:

Branch: Luftwaffe
Born: 21 February 1915
Died: 9 February 1975 in Augsburg, Germany

Ranks:
Test Pilot 1930 to 1945

Decorations:

Commands:

Personal Information:

Fritz Wendell was a German test pilot. During World War II on the 26th of April 1939, Fritz Wendell set a new world air speed record flying the Me 209 V-1.

He managed to break the previous record set by Hans Dieterle on 30 March 1939 flying the He 100 V-8. Fritz Wendell was also the first test pilot to fly Me 209 with a liquid fuelled rocket engine, also Fritz test flew the He 280 which was powered by a jet engine On 18 July 1942 in Leipheim near Günzburg, Germany, Fritz Wendell test flew the Me 262, this test light was conducted with the Junkers Jumbo 003 jet engines fitted.

Gallery:

Other: Personnel
Articles:

Sources:

For a complete list of sources

Walther Wenck

Walther Wenck

Career:

Branch: Heer
Born: 18 September 1900 in Wittenberg, Germany.
Died: 1 May 1982 in Bad Rothenfelde, Lower Saxony, Germany.

Ranks:
General der Panzertruppe 1 October 1944
Generalleutnant 1 April 1944
Generalmajor 1 March 1943
Oberst 1 June 1942
Oberstleutnant
Major 1 August 1939
Hauptmann 1 May 1934
Oberleutnant 3 October 1928
Leutnant 1 February 1923
Fähnrich 1 November 1921

Decorations:
Sudetenland Medal 4 September 1939
Iron Cross 1939
2nd Class 13 September 1939
1st Class 4 October 1939
Wound Badge
in Black 18 May 1940
Eastern Front Medal 1 August 1942
German Cross in Gold 26 January 1942
Knights Cross of the Iron Cross on 28 December 1942

Commands:

Personal Information:

Walther Wenck was born on 18 September 1900 and went on to become the youngest general in the German Army during World War II. At the end of the war, he commanded the German 12. Armee (12th Army). Wenck ordered his army to surrender to forces of the United States in order to avoid capture by the Soviets. Before surrendering, Wenck played an important, if unsuccessful, part in the Battle of Berlin. He was known during the war as The Boy General.

Wenck was born in Wittenberg, Germany. Prior to joining the Army (Reichswehr) of the Weimar Republic in 1920, he was a member of the Free Corps (Freikorps) in 1919.

From 1939 to 1942, Wenck was Chief of Operations for the First Panzer Division. In 1942, he was an instructor for the War Academy, Chief of Staff for the LVII Corps, and Chief of Staff for the Third Romanian Army on the Eastern Front.

Wenck stayed on the Eastern Front and, from 1942 to 1943, he was Chief of Staff of Army Detachment Hollidt which was subordinated to the Third Romanian Army. In 1943, he was Chief of Staff of the Sixth Army. From 1943 to 1944, Wenck was Chief of Staff of the First Panzer Army. In 1944, he was Chief of Staff of Heeresgruppe Südukraine.

From 1944 to 1945, Wenck was Quartermaster General I.

From 15 February 1945, at the insistence of General Heinz Guderian, Wenck commanded the German forces involved in Operation Solstice (Unternehmen Sonnenwende) on the Eastern Front. With General Felix Steiner commanding the 11th SS Panzer Army, this was one of the last major German tank offensives of the war. Approximately 300 German armoured fighting vehicles attacked Soviet positions in Pomerania. The operation was poorly planned and poorly supported, and ended in Soviet victory on 18 February.

On 10 April 1945, as General of Panzer Troops, Wenck was made the commander of the German 12. Armee (12th Army) located to the west of Berlin. The 12. Armee (12th Army) was positioned to defend against the advancing American and British forces on the Western Front. But, as both the Western Front moved eastwards and the Eastern Front moved westwards, the German armies making up both fronts backed towards each other. As a result, the area of control of Wenck's army to his rear and east of the Elbe River had become a vast refugee camp for German civilians fleeing the path of the approaching Soviet forces. Wenck took great pains to provide food and lodging for these refugees. At one stage, the 12. Armee (12th Army) was estimated to be feeding more than a quarter million people every day.

On 21 April, Adolf Hitler ordered SS-General Felix Steiner to attack the forces of Soviet Marshal Georgy Zhukov's 1st Belorussian Front. Zhukov's forces were encircling Berlin from the north. The forces of Soviet Marshal Ivan Konev's 1st Ukrainian Front were encircling Berlin from the south. Steiner was to attack Zhukov with his Army Detachment Steiner. With few operational tanks and roughly a division's worth of infantry, Steiner declined to attack. Instead, he requested that his army be allowed to retreat to avoid its own encirclement and annihilation.

On 22 April, as Steiner and Army Detachment Steiner retreated, Wenck's 12. Armee (12th Army) became Adolf Hitler's last hope to save Berlin. Wenck was ordered to disengage the Americans to his west and, attacking to the east, link up with the Ninth Army of Colonel General (Generaloberst) Theodor Busse. Together, they would attack the Soviets encircling Berlin from the west and from the south. Meanwhile, the XXXXI Panzerkorps (XLI Panzer Corps) under General Rudolf Holste would attack the Soviets from the north. Unfortunately for the Germans in Berlin, much of Holste's forces consisted of transfers from Steiner's depleted units.

Wenck's army, only recently formed, did make a sudden turn around and, in the general confusion, surprised the Russians surrounding the German capital with an unexpected attack. Wenck's forces attacked towards Berlin in good morale and made some initial progress, but they were halted outside of Potsdam by strong Soviet resistance.

Neither Busse or Holste made much progress towards Berlin. By the end of the day on 27 April, the Soviet forces encircling Berlin linked up and the forces inside Berlin were completely cut off from the rest of Germany.

On 28 April, German General and Chief of Staff Hans Krebs, made his last telephone call from the Führerbunker. He called Field Marshal Wilhelm Keitel at the new Supreme Command Headquarters in Fürstenberg. Hans Krebs told Keitel that, if relief did not arrive within 48 hours, all would be lost. Keitel promised to exert the utmost pressure on Generals Wenck and Busse.

During the night of 28 April, Wenck reported to the German Supreme Army Command in Fuerstenberg that his 12. Armee (12th Army) had been forced back along the entire front. This was particularly true of XX Corps which had been able to establish temporary contact with the Potsdam garrison. According to Wenck, no attack on Berlin was now possible. This was even more so as support from Busse's Ninth Army could no longer be expected.

Late in the evening of 29 April, Hans Krebs contacted General Alfred Jodl (Supreme Army Command) by radio: Request immediate report. Firstly of the whereabouts of Wenck's spearheads. Secondly of time intended to attack. Thirdly of the location of the Ninth Army. Fourthly of the precise place in which the Ninth Army will break through. Fifthly of the whereabouts of General Rudolf Holste's spearhead.

In the early morning of 30 April, Jodl replied to Hans Krebs: Firstly, Wenck's spearhead bogged down south of Schwielow Lake. Secondly, 12. Armee (12th Army) therefore unable to continue attack on Berlin. Thirdly, bulk of Ninth Army surrounded. Fourthly, Holste's Corps on the defensive.

As his attempt to reach Berlin started to look impossible, Wenck developed a plan to move his army towards the Forest of Halbe. There he planned to link up with the remnants of the Ninth Army, Hellmuth Reymann's Army Group Spree, and the Potsdam garrison. Wenck also wanted to provide an escape route for as many citizens of Berlin as possible.

Arriving at the furthest point of his attack, Wenck radioed the message: Hurry up, we are waiting for you. Despite the attacks on his escape path, Wenck brought his own army, remnants of the Ninth Army, and many civilian refugees safely across the Elbe and into territory occupied by the U.S. Army. Estimates vary, but it is likely the corridor his forces opened enabled up to 250,000 refugees, including up to 25,000 men of the Ninth Army, to escape towards the west just ahead of the advancing Soviets.

According to Antony Beevor, Wenck's eastward attack toward Berlin was aimed specifically at providing the population and garrison of Berlin with an escape route to areas occupied by United States armed forces:

Comrades, you've got to go in once more, Wenck said. It's not about Berlin any more, it's not about the Reich any more. Their task was to save people from the fighting and the Russians. Hans-Dietrich Genscher, then a young sapper with the 12. Armee (12th Army), described their emotions as a feeling of loyalty, a sense of responsibility and comradeship. Wenck's leadership struck a powerful chord, even if the reactions varied between those who believed in a humanitarian operation and those keener to surrender to the Western allies instead of the Russians.
Antony Beevor Wenck was captured and put in a prisoner of war camp. He was released in 1947. In 1982, Wenck died in a car accident in Bad Rothenfelde.

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Robert Weber

Career:

Branch: Kriegsmarine
Born: 14 January 1905.
Died: 12 November 1944.

Ranks:
Kapitän zur See
Fregattenkapitän
Korvettenkapitän
Kapitänleutnant
Oberleutnant zur See
Leutnant zur See
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See

Decorations:

Commands:
Tirpitz
Takes command on 4 November 1944
Ends command on 12 November 1944

Personal Information:

Robert Weber was born on 14 January 1905 and was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Kapitän zur See and went on to command the following Tirpitz.

Robert Weber was given the command of the battleship Tirpitz on 4 November 1944 and remained in command until 12 November 1944.

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Erwin Waßner

Erwin Waßner

Career:

Branch: Kriegsmarine
Born: 1 March 1887 in Rendsburg, Germany.
Died: 24 August 1937 in Den Haag, The Netherlands.

Ranks:
Konteradmiral
Kommodore
Kapitän zur See
Fregattenkapitän
Korvettenkapitän
Kapitänleutnant
Oberleutnant zur See
Leutnant zur See
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See

Decorations:
Iron Cross 1914
1st Class
2nd Class
Knight's Cross of the Royal House Order of Hohenzollern with swords
Pour le Merit 5 March 1918
U-boat War Badge 1918
Prussian Rescue Medal of the Order
Hanseatic Cross Hamburg
Medal for rescue from danger
Knight's Cross First Class of the Ducal Saxe-Ernestine House Order with swords

Commands:
UC-3
Takes command on 27 September 1915
Ends command on 12 May 1916

UB-38
Takes command on 10 September 1916
Ends command on 18 November 1916

UC-69
Takes command on 23 December 1916
Ends command on 8 August 1917

UB-59
Takes command on 25 August 1917
Ends command on 5 May 1918

UB-117
Takes command on 6 June 1918
Ends command on 11 November 1918

Karlsruhe
Takes command on 25 September 1931
Ends command on 8 December 1932

Personal Information:

Erwin Waßner was born on 1 March 1887 in Rendsburg, Germany and was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Konteradmiral and went on to command the following UC-3, UB-38, UC-69, UB-59, UB-117 and Karlsruhe.

Erwin Waßner joined Kaiserliche Marine as a Seekadett on 1 April 1906 and continued his training on board heavy cruiser SMS Stein.

Erwin Waßner was given the command of U-boat UC-3 on 27 September 1915 and remained in command until 12 May 1916 he was then transferred to the U-boat UB-38 on 10 September 1916 until 18 November 1916 he was once again transferred to the U-boat UC-69 an 23 December 1916 until 8 August 1917 he was transferred to the U-boat UB-59 on 25 August 1917 until 5 May 1918 he was transferred again to the U-boat UB-117 on 6 June 1918 on sale 11 November 1918, after a number of years Erwin Waßner was given the command of of the light cruiser Karlsruhe on 25 September 1931 until 8 December 1932.

A U-boats fleet tender was named in his honour the Erwin Waßner which was put into operation on 29 March 1939.

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Walter Warzecha

Walter Warzecha

Career:

Branch: Kriegsmarine
Born: 23 May 1891 in Schwiebus, near Brandenburg, Germany.
Died: 30 August 1956 in Hamburg, Germany.

Ranks:
Generaladmiral 1 March 1944
Admiral 1 April 1942
Vizeadmiral 1 January 1941
Konteradmiral 1 November 1938
Kommodore
Kapitän zur See 1 October 1934
Fregattenkapitän
Korvettenkapitän 1 January 1928
Kapitänleutnant 21 January 1920
Oberleutnant zur See 2 May 1915
Leutnant zur See 19 September 1912
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See 12 April 1910

Decorations:
Iron Cross with clasp
1st class
2nd class
German Cross in Silver 30 January 1943
Knight's Cross of the War Merit Cross with Swords 25 January 1945

Commands:
UC-1
Takes command on 18 March 1917
Ends command on 1 June 1917

UC-71
Takes command on 29 January 1918
Ends command on 13 August 1918

UB-148
Takes command on 19 September 1918
Ends command on 11 November 1918

Admiral Graf Spee
Takes command on 2 October 1937
Ends command on 1 November 1938

Personal Information:

Walter Warzecha was born on 23 May 1891 in Schwiebus, near Brandenburg, Germany and was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Generaladmiral and went on to command the following UC-1, UC-71, UB-148 and Admiral Graf Spee.

On 1 April 1909 Walter Warzecha joined the Kaiserliche Marine as a Seekadett. Walter Warzecha first post was aboard the heavy cruiser Victoria Louise were he was promoted to Fähnrich zur See in April 1910. Between 1911 and 1916 he served on the pre-dreadnought battleship Nassau, and there was promoted to the rank of Leutnant zur See in September 1912, and then to Oberleutnant zur See on 2 May 1915.

In August 1916 till the conclusion of the First World War he served as the commandant of various U-boats, UC-1, UC-71 and UB-148, and sank 9 ships amounting to 22,612 GRT, and damaged 10 more for a total of 55,808 GRT.

After the war Walter Warzecha settled down in Wilhelmshaven and then Kiel, where he began a family and became a father of 4. Following the remilitarisation of Germany Walter Warzecha went back to active duty within the Marinestation der Nordsee, with the rank of Kapitänleutnant from 1920. Promotion to Korvettenkapitän followed in 1928 and then to Fregattenkapitän in 1933. In 1934 Walter Warzecha became Chief of Staff of the Marinestation der Ostsee in the Baltic. Walter Warzecha served as the commandant of the pocket battleship Admiral Graf Spee between October 1937 and October 1938.

On 1 November 1938 Walter Warzecha was promoted to the rank of Konteradmiral and moved to a staff position in Berlin at the Chief of the Naval Defence Office (Oberkommando der Marine, serving as Chef des Marinewehramtes) until August 1942, gaining promotion to Vizeadmiral on 1 January 1941, and also serving as Chief of General Navy Headquarters (Chef des Allgemeinen Marinehauptamtes) between November 1939 and April 1944. On 1 March 1944 Walter Warzecha was promoted to the rank of Generaladmiral and on 1 May was appointed Chief of the Navy (Chef der Kriegsmarinewehr).

At the conclusion of the Second World War, and the suicide of the commander-in-chief Hans-Georg von Friedeburg on 23 May 1945, Walter Warzecha took over the responsibilities of the Commander-in-Chief under Allied control, and managed the Kriegsmarine's breakup until 22 July 1945.

Walter Warzecha was held captive as a POW until 1947, Walter Warzecha then relocated to Hamburg where he worked for the Allianz-Versicherungsgesellschaft insurance firm. Walter Warzecha passed away of a heart attack on 30 August 1956 and is buried in Hamburg, Germany.

Walter Warzecha was given the command of U-boat UC-1 on 18 March 1917 and remained in command until 1 June 1917, he was then transferred to the U-boat UC-71 on 29 January 1918 until 13 August 1918 he was then transferred again to the U-boat UB-148 on 19 September 1918 until the 11th of November 1918, a number of years later Walter Warzecha was given command of the pocket battleship Admiral Graf Spee on 2 October 1937 until 1 November 1938.

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Wilhelm Warnholtz

Career:

Branch: Kriegsmarine
Born:
Died:

Ranks:
Korvettenkapitän
Kapitänleutnant
Oberleutnant zur See
Leutnant zur See
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See

Decorations:


Commands:
Admiral Hugo Zeye
Takes command on July 1942
Ends command on November 1944

Personal Information:

Wilhelm Warnholtz was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Korvettenkapitän and went on to command the following Admiral Hugo Zeye.

Wilhelm Warnholtz was given the command of the training ship Admiral Hugo Zeye on July 1942 and remained in command until November 1944.

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Hubert Freiherr von Wangenheim

Career:

Branch: Kriegsmarine
Born:
Died:

Ranks:
Kapitän zur See
Fregattenkapitän
Korvettenkapitän
Kapitänleutnant
Oberleutnant zur See
Leutnant zur See
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See

Decorations:

Commands:
Albatros
Takes command on October 1935
Ends command on September 1936

Hans Lody
Takes command on August 1939
Ends command on October 1940

Personal Information:

Hubert Freiherr von Wangenheim was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Kapitän zur See and went on to command the following Albatros and Hans Lody (Z10).

Hubert Freiherr von Wangenheim took command of the torpedo boat Albatros on October 1935 and remained in command until September 1936. After several years Hubert Freiherr von Wangenheim was given command of the destroyer Hans Lody (Z10) on August 1939 until October 1940.

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Hellmuth Walter

Hellmuth Walter

Career:

Branch: Civilian
Born: 26 August 1900 in Wedel near Hamburg, Germany.
Died: 16 December 1980 in Upper Montclair, New Jersey.

Appointment's:

Decorations:

Personal Information:

Hellmuth Walter was a German engineer who pioneered research into rocket engines and gas turbines. His most noteworthy contributions were rocket motors for the Messerschmitt Me 163 and Bachem Ba 349 interceptor aircraft, JATO units used for a variety of Luftwaffe aircraft during World War II, and a revolutionary new propulsion system for submarines known as air-independent propulsion (AIP).

Walter began training as a machinist in 1917 in Hamburg and in 1921 commenced studies in mechanical engineering at the Hamburg Technical Institute. He left before completing these studies, however, in order to take up a position at the Stettiner Maschinenbau AG Vulcan, a major shipyard. Walter's experience with marine engines here led him to become interested in overcoming some of the limitations of the internal combustion engine. He reasoned that an engine powered by a fuel source already rich with oxygen would not require an external supply of oxygen (from the atmosphere or from tanks). This would have obvious advantages for powering submarines and torpedoes.

Research suggested that hydrogen peroxide was a suitable fuel in the presence of a suitable catalyst it would break down into oxygen and steam at high temperature. The heat of the reaction would cause the oxygen and steam to expand, and this could be used as a source of pressure. Walter also realised that another fuel could be injected into this hot mixture of gases to provide combustion and therefore more power. He patented this idea in 1925.

After working for some time at the Germaniawerft shipyard in Kiel, Walter branched out on his own in 1934 to form his own company, Hellmuth Walter Kommanditgesellschaft (HWK, or Walter-Werke), to further research and development of his ideas. That same year, he made a proposal to the Oberkommando der Kriegsmarine (OKM-Naval High Command) suggesting that a submarine powered by one of these engines would have considerable speed advantages over the conventional combination of diesel engine(s) for surface running and electric motor(s) while submerged. The proposal was met with much scepticism, but Walter persisted, and in 1937 showed his plans to Karl Dönitz, who was able to assist in obtaining a contract to produce a prototype. Construction started in 1939 on a small research submarine designated the V-80. When it was launched in 1940, the submarine demonstrated a top speed of 23 knots submerged, twice that of any submarine in the world at the time. Despite these spectacular results, problems with the production, supply, and safe handling of hydrogen peroxide prevented wide-scale implementation of Walter's revolutionary engine. In the end, only a handful of German XVII Type U-boats were built using this engine, and none saw combat.

At the same time that Walter was developing submarine engines, he was also applying his ideas to rocketry. The high pressure gas mixture created by the rapid decomposition of hydrogen peroxide could not only be used in a turbine, but if simply directed out of a nozzle, created considerable thrust. Wernher von Braun's rocketry team working at Peenemünde expressed interest in Walter's ideas, and in 1936 began a programme of installing Walter rockets into aircraft. The experimental results obtained by von Braun created interest among Germany's aircraft manufacturers, including Heinkel and Messerschmitt, and in 1939, the Heinkel He 176 became the first aircraft to fly on liquid-fuelled rocket power alone. This type of engine went on to become the cornerstone of the Messerschmitt Me 163 rocket-powered fighter, when married to Alexander Lippisch's revolutionary airframe design. Throughout the course of World War II, Walter's aircraft engines became increasingly powerful and refined. The original design of simply decomposing hydrogen peroxide was soon changed to its use as an oxidizer, when combined with a hydrazine/methanol true rocket fuel designated C-Stoff, into the hot, high-pressure gases, and in later, never-deployed developments, a second, 400 kg (880 lb) thrust cruising combustion chamber was added to allow for more precise control of the engine. Versions of this engine powered a variety of aircraft and missile projects and was also licence-built in Japan (see HWK 109-509).

Another Walter engine was used to assist heavily-laden aircraft to take off (JATO or RATO). When the rockets' fuel had run out, they would separate from the aircraft and return to the ground by parachute for refurbishment and reuse (see HWK 109-500).

In 1945, Walter was awarded the Knight's Cross for his wartime service. As described in Sean Longdens book 'T Force, the Race for Nazi War Secrets' Dr Walter was captured by a British Army unit named T-Force following a 60-mile advance behind German lines to prevent his research falling into the hands of the advancing Russians. His factory was then investigated by 30 Assault Unit, a unit of Royal Marines which had been established by James Bond author Ian Fleming.

The end of the war saw all of his research materials confiscated by the British military and Walter and his colleagues taken to the UK to work for the Royal Navy. With Walter's co-operation, one of the German submarines using his drive, the U-1407 was raised from where it had been scuttled and re-commissioned as HMS Meteorite. The Royal Navy constructed two more submarines using AIP engines before abandoning research in this direction in favour of nuclear power.

Allowed to return to Germany in 1948, Walter worked for the Paul Seifert Engine Works. In 1950 he emigrated to the United States and joined the Worthington Pump Corporation of Harrison, New Jersey, eventually becoming vice president of research and development. In 1956 he founded the company Hellmuth Walter GmbH in Kiel, and in 1967 constructed a civilian submarine, STINT, with Walter propulsion.

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Willy Wagner

Career:

Branch: Kriegsmarine
Born: 13 April 1924.
Died:

Ranks:
Kapitänleutnant
Oberleutnant zur See
Leutnant zur See
Oberfähnrich zur See
Fähnrich zur See

Decorations:

Commands:
Seeadler
Takes command on April 1929
Ends command on August 1929

Leopard
Takes command on August 1929
Ends command on October 1929

Leberecht Maaß
Takes command on October 1937
Ends command on April 1939

Personal Information:

Willy Wagner was born on 13 April 1924 and was a serving member of the Kriegsmarine during World War II and managed to attain the rank of Kapitänleutnant and went on to command the following Seeadler, Leopard and Leberecht Maaß (Z1).

Willy Wagner took command of the torpedo boat Seeadler on April 1929 and remained in command until August 1929, he was then transferred to the torpedo boat Leopard on August 1929 until October 1929, after a few years Willy Wagner was given command of the destroyer Leberecht Maaß (Z1) on October 1937, until April 1939 .

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Herbert Alois Wagner

Career:

Branch: Civilian
Born: 22 May 1900 in Graz, Austria.
Died: 28 May 1982 in United States of America.

Appointment's:
Rohrbach Metall-Flugzeugbau 1920
Technical University of Berlin
Junkers Flugzeugwerke
Henschel Flugzeugwerke 1940

Decorations:

Personal Information:

Dr.-Ing. Herbert Alois Wagner was a Austrian scientist who worked for the German arms industry, during World War II. He designed and developed several guided missiles as well as developing many innovations in aerodynamics.

Herbert Wagner attended the Austrian naval academy, from 1914 to 1917 and served as an Ensign in the Australian Navy during the First World War. The ship, he was serving aboard was struck by an enemy torpedo, although he survived his ship didn't. On returning to civilian life He took up his academic studies and went to the technical University of Berlin, and and obtained his doctorate at the tender age of 23.

In the mid 1920s. He started work for Rohrbach Metall-Flugzeugbau which was a small aeroplane factory in Berlin. It was while working at Rohrbach Metall-Flugzeugbau that Herbert invented the so-called Wagner beam (a method of constructing aircraft structural components from sheet metal).
After finishing at the aircraft factory Herbert held the position off Professor at the technical University of Berlin. Herbert's next job was at Junkers Flugzeugwerke where he played a fundamental role in the development of the first jet engines, but unfortunately fell out with the management of Junkers and left to join Henschel Flugzeugwerke in Berlin.

As soon as Herbert started work at Henschel. He began working on remote controlled aircraft in July 1940 he began work on a prototype glider bomb which later led to the Hs 293 and the Hs 117 missiles.
TheHs 293 had considerable success during its early deployment sinking HMS Egret on 27 August 1943 and HMT Rohna on 26 November 1943 with a loss of over a thousand soldiers and crewmen.

Dr Herbert Alois Wagner was relocated to the United States. After World War II, as part of Operation Paperclip.

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