Facebook

Wehrmacht Personnel Listed Alphabetically

There are approximately 538 Wehrmacht Personnel details listed alphabetically, The list of Wehrmacht Personnel details is by no means complete and will be added to over the coming weeks.

Key for abbreviations.
(C) = Civilian.
(G) = Government, Royalty.
(H) = Kaiserliche Heer, Reichsheer, Wehrmacht Heer.
(K) = Kaiserliche Marine, Reichsmarine, Kriegsmarine.
(L) = Luftstreitkraefte, Luftwaffe.
(SA) = Sturmabteilung.
(SS) = Waffen SS.

Wehrmacht Personnal Details For The Letter A
Wehrmacht Personnal Details For The Letter B
Wehrmacht Personnal Details For The Letter C
Wehrmacht Personnal Details For The Letter D
Wehrmacht Personnal Details For The Letter E
Wehrmacht Personnal Details For The Letter F
Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter G
Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter H
Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter I
Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter J
Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter K
Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter L
Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter M
Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter N
Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter O
Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter P
Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter Q
Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter R
Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter S
Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter T
Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter U
Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter V
Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter W
Wehrmacht Personnel Details For The Letter Z
Identify Personnel

German Surnames
Note: In the name John Henry Ducrot, John Henry are Christian names while Ducrot is a family name or surname.

1. The most confusing form of 'German surname is that in which a person has two surnames, of which he habitually uses only one, since there is no general rule to indicate which of the two names is generally used. For example, Field Marshal von Lewinski genannt von Manstein (literally, von Lewinski called von Manstein) is customarily known as von Manstein, and he is listed among the field marshals under the letter M. However, Lt General von Hartlieb genannt Wal-sporn is normally known as von Hartlieb, and he is therefore listed under the letter H.

2. In some cases of double surnames, where the term genannt is not employed,the von (equivalent to de in French surnames) is customarily transposed; for example, General Geyr von Schweppenburg, formerly German Military Attache \in London, is normally referred to as von Geyr. In general, where two surnames are connected by und (and), the first of the two is used: thus, Lt General von Rothkirch und Panthen is usually called von Rothkirch. Hyphenated names are often but not invariably used in full.

3. Christian names are seldom if ever used in signatures. Officers sign orders with family name and rank only. It is therefore difficult, at times,to discover an officer's Christian name or initials (neither of which is shown in any official document, except in the original registration, or when two men of the same name and rank must be distinguished from each other), so that in a few cases in the following lists there is a possibility of confusion between officers having the same surname.

4. Academic degrees, such as Dr. or Dr. Ing., are regularly shown before the surname both in official documents and in signatures, and are therefore included in the following lists.

German Titles
1. Persons with hereditary titles are more frequently found in Germany than in Great Britain, because German titles do not pass only from eldest son to eldest son, or to the nearest male blood relation (as in the United Kingdom), but from the father to all his sons. They in turn transmit the title to their sons (except in certain princely families in which the title Prinz is borne solely by the head of the family). The titles most commonly used are listed below.

2. Graf (Count) corresponds approximately to Earl. As with other titles, it is usually followed by von, though in referring to a Count the prefix is often omitted;thus, Lt General Graf von Sponeck is normally described as Graf Sponeck.

3. Freiherr, abbreviated Frhr. (Baron) corresponds approximately to the lowest degree of the British peerage. The title Baron, which also occurs, is of non-German origin. In conversation a Freiherr is generally referred to as Baron the prefix von being omitted; thus, Colonel General Frhr v. Weichs may be described as Baron Weichs.

4. Ritter (Knight) corresponds in some cases to Baronet and in others to Knight. A Ritter whose title is hereditary usually owns a Rittergut or Knight's estate and takes his name from it. In other cases, the title is derived from a grant made to an officer for heroism in action or for distinguished service to the state. In Bavaria, until 1919, the Military Order of Max Joseph carried with it a patent of Knighthood which was not hereditary- -hence the title of Field Marshal Ritter von Leeb whose son, killed in action in Poland in 1939, was Lieutenant Leeb.

5. Edler (Noble) approximately equivalent to Baronet. The titles Ritter and Edler are, in most cases, of Bavarian or Austrian origin.

6. The prefix von corresponds most closely to the English suffix Esquire(in the strict sense), denoting the right to bear arms.

Sources

For a complete list of sources

No comments:

Post a Comment

Post a Comment